Rafik Riad’s view on SDG 6: Clean Water and Sanitation

Rafik Riad, originally from Egypt, has studied and worked globally on policy design and project implementation in the field of international development. In 2011, Rafik founded SALT, a fair-trade social enterprise that worked with communities in Africa and Latin America. Rafik’s appreciation for social enterprise as a business model that circumvents both the volatility of traditional development frameworks and the shortcomings of conventional corporate models led him to found Buy Good. Feel Good. in 2014.

Today, Buy Good. Feel Good is North America’s largest marketplace dedicated to connecting social enterprises with buyers and consumers.

We caught up with Rashid during our Transforming our World Symposium, we asked him to elaborate on the SDG that resonates with him most, clean water and sanitation.

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“No life without water, through my Egypt origin I am very much aware about the importance of water, we all need to ensure the availability and sustainable management of water”

-Rashid Riad

 

Alumni​ Spotlight: Sepideh Ghahremani

Inspired by the vibrant colours and intricate patterns of Iranian architecture, Sepideh Ghahremani’s collections, Deevaand Forest Glory, reflects the symmetrical and lustrous imagery of the traditional Persian Baagh (garden), that can be found in her country of origin, Iran.

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With a background in fashion design from the University of Tehran, and a painter by profession, Sepideh has always had the desire to work in the fashion industry. Owing her artistic process to her background in painting, Sepideh approaches fashion design through an idiosyncratic and creative lens, seeing the human body as a surface for her artistic expression.

Her collections Deevaand Forest Glory, showcased at the 21stCentury Atelier: Redefining Fashion in a New Age of Design, a collaborative event between the Seneca School of Fashion and the Royal Ontario Museum, is one of the highlights of her career. “[This is] a very unexpected opportunity for me,” says Sepideh. “I’m thankful to Seneca for involving me in this event, and to display my designs right next to Dior…It’s just fantastic. My collection is very feminine — and I try to be more focused on the feminine body type – in many ways, it’s related [to Dior].” commented Sepideh. The event ran concurrent with the Christian Dior exhibit, a brand she considers as one of her biggest influences.

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Using silk, hand-dyed satin and fabrics that she designs herself, Sepideh visually captures and manipulates organic elements found in nature, adorning her fabrics with shapes of flowers or leaves, in the attempt to create an illusion of being one with nature.

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One of her most praised pieces in the event features a design from her Forest Glorycollection; a mid-length, deep mauve and black A-line dress, embellished with symmetrical leaves across the front and back. The inspiration of the design – a leaf she photographed and later sketched into fabric.

Sepideh’s choice to highlight vivid colours in her silhouettes are intentional, which she traces back to fashion trends she observed while living in Iran. Patterns and embroidery in ruby red, deep purple, dusty pink, rich blues, golds and black are some of the colours seen on clothing worn by women in Iran, and similarly on Sepideh’s designs.

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When asked what she would like to tell fashion Students at Seneca, Sepideh said, “If you have a passion for fashion, pursue it!  It is not an easy industry. There will be a lot of designers who will be in the same position as you and you need to work hard.”

 

 

 

 

 

Alumni Spotlight: Tala Nehlawi

We love when our grads have the opportunity to showcase their collections outside the classroom! Over the next month, we will feature the work of three all-star #FashionArts students – starting with Tala Nehlawi and her collection, Love Damascus.

At the age of 22, Tala Nehlawi has celebrated countless accomplishments in the fashion industry that many designers can only dream of.  Her collection, Damas, recently showcased beside the Christian Dior exhibit at the 21st Century Atelier: Redefining Fashion in a New Age of Design, a collaborative event hosted by the Seneca School of Fashion and the Royal Ontario Museum received a great deal of attention from Toronto fashion elites.

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“It was the most amazing opportunity ever. I thank Seneca so much for it,” says Tala. “Usually, when you have a big reputation or you’re a huge brand – that’s when you get [to showcase your line] in a museum. It also gave me the opportunity to connect with people. You don’t really get to do that in a fashion show.” commented Tala.

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Dedicating her collection, Damas, to her native country, Syria, Tala uses fashion as a medium to build awareness and show people that “despite all the destruction, Syria is still utterly beautiful.” Inspired by the architecture and antiques of the historical regions of Damascus, Tala’s silhouettes and hand-made purses have a Middle Eastern twist, with some of her designs inscribed ‘Love Damascus’ in Arabic calligraphy.  Her favourite piece from the line is a copper dress, with a domed-shaped neckline, influenced by the geometrical shape found in copper plates in Damascus.

For Tala, her creative process starts with inspiration, whether it’s from travelling, experiencing other cultures or being immersed in nature. “[My designs] reflect how I feel,” says Tala. “When I’m inspired, I start sketching – then I go out looking for fabrics and start draping and sewing. I also like working in a messy environment – my studio is kind of my bedroom.”

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While working in the fashion industry for only a few years, Tala’s ambition and business ethic speak for itself. She will be showcasing her new collection for the second consecutive year at the Fashion Art Toronto (FAT) show in April. While she does not have a name for her new collection yet, Tala says, “what I can tell you, is that it’s very different from Damas. Be prepared for a very colourful and different runaway set-up!”

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As an independent and ambitious designer, with a keen desire to learn and evolve, Tala hopes to pursue taking fashion courses in Europe as well as working towards her entrepreneurship certificate. She is currently working on developing her brand and hopes to design a new “it bag” in the future, something that she has always dreamed of accomplishing.

As a recent graduate of the Seneca School of Fashion, Tala is grateful for the relationships she built throughout her studies. “My favourite part [of being a student at Seneca] were my professors. They are knowledgeable and very well connected in the industry. I see them as my mentors.”

Seneca Fashion Alumni, Kaitlyn Simmons launches Boutique Men’s Shop in Bermuda

All smiles: Kaitlyn Simmons, left, and Lianna Masters, co-owners of Banter & Steel (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

Congratulations to Seneca Fashion Alumni, Kaitlyn Simmons for launching Banter & Steel, a men’s apparel and lifestyle store co-owned with her sister Lianna Masters. Kaitlyn graduated from the two-year program 2009 and late worked as a buyer for Gibbons Company, while Lianna’s background is in business administration. Both have long had ambitions to open a store.

Banter and Steel, sources brands from the United States, United Kingdom, Canada and Australia, they have carefully curated a selection of contemporary clothing, workwear, accessories, gifts, home and grooming products for men.

Banter and Steel (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

Banter and Steel (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

Co-owning sisters: Kaitlyn Simmons, left, and Lianna Masters (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

Banter and Steel (Photograph by Akil Simmons)

Photos courtesy of the Royal Gazette in Bermuda.

The co-owners have been on buying trips to brand showcases in New York and will be travelling to Las Vegas in August to view the spring/summer 2020 collections. They also do extensive research online.

Brands include Montreal’s Bosco Uomo suits and Lief Horsens shirts, Rustic Dime chinos and T-shirts from Los Angeles, Far Afield shirts, T-shirts, shorts and swim trunks from the UK, Fulton and Roark grooming products from the US, bags by American manufacturer Hook & Albert, and bags, wallets and phone cases by Australian maker Bellroy.

We are #SenecaProud of your entrepreneurial journey, Kaitlyn! For more of this story, visit the Royal Gazette

Not a baa-d look

“There are great interdisciplinary opportunities between our classes to build an emotional connection between fashion and agriculture. I mean, fashion comes from agriculture. It’s a resource.”

June 13, 2019

 

When Kirsti Clarida, a Veterinary Technician professor, and Philip Sparks, a Fashion Arts professor, met last year through Seneca’s faculty development program, they knew they had to work together.

“Within 10 minutes, we looked at each other and we were like, ‘Oh my God.’ I have sheep and he needs fleece — it’s a no-brainer,” Clarida said. “The sheep we have at King Campus, they absolutely need to be shorn. They get hot and they can’t regulate their body temperature.”

The collaboration between Clarida and Sparks resulted in a sheep shearing project that saw more than 100 students from both of their programs pass through the barns at King Campus recently, learning about the process of shearing wool and turning it into yarn and clothes.

“There are great interdisciplinary opportunities between our classes to build an emotional connection between fashion and agriculture,” Sparks said. “I mean, fashion comes from agriculture. It’s a resource. The sheep fleece at King was being discarded or donated and yet, in the fashion program, we were purchasing it.”

A total of 14 sheep were shorn by Don Metherall, a Canadian champion shearer formerly ranked top 20 in the world.

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Students watch a demonstration of a sheep hammock, used to trim the animal’s hooves or perform exams without holding it.
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The collaboration between Veterinary Technician and Fashion Arts programs saw more than 100 students pass through the barns at King Campus recently.
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Seneca President David Agnew holds a baby lamb while learning more about the sheep shearing project from Professor Kirsti Clarida.

Wool processing: fleece to fabric

During the sheep shearing project, students learned about how fabric is made from fleece. A member of the Upper Canada Fibreshed, the Fashion Arts class took some raw wool back to their textile lab and studied the process of cleaning, carding, felting/spinning. The fibre will be processed by Wool 4 Ewe, and the yarn will be used in the program’s knitwear and textile classes as well as felting and weaving projects.

Wool is a sustainable fibre that is biodegradable, breathable and highly versatile. It is also unique in its ability to felt. This is when wool fibre is subject to a mixture of moisture, heat, soap and friction. The moisture heat and soap open up the scales on the fibre surface and friction causes the fibres to latch onto one another, almost like Velcro.

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Raw or grease wool: wool taken from the sheep that has not yet been cleaned or processed.
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Yarn: roving that has been stretched and twisted or spun.
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Roving: wool that has been cleaned and carded or combed, usually used to spin woollen yarn.
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Cloth: yarns that have been woven, organized at 90 degrees to one another.

Sheep shearing with a champion

Sheep at Seneca’s King Campus are shorn once a year, typically during the spring. As part of the sheep shearing project, a total of 14 sheep were in good hands with Don Metherall, a Canadian champion shearer formerly ranked top 20 in the world. He has been shearing for almost two decades, shearing about 28,000 sheep each year.

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Don Metherall is a Canadian champion shearer. Each sheep is sheared in a matter of seconds, with each fleece being removed from the sheep in one piece.
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Professor Kirsti Clarida and Professor Philip Sparks sort through a freshly shorn fleece before putting it into a bag.
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Don Metherall talks to Professor Philip Sparks about shearing a black sheep.
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A young lamb kneels to drink milk from the mother sheep after she was shorn by Don Metherall at King Campus.

Seneca Fashion Professor and Program Coordinator Anna Cappuccitti’s Sustainability Development Goal #SDG

 

Picture1.png_AnnaAnna Cappuccitti is a Program Coordinator and extensively experienced professor in the Fashion Business Programs at Seneca College. Committed to student success and developing and delivering a curriculum that meets industry demands, she has a career background in fashion buying, product development and retail operations. Research interests include retail management careers and retail management education. She was awarded “Best Paper” at the EAERCD conference in 2017 for “Profiling People’s Perceptions of Retail Management Careers”, published in The International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research.

When asked her favourite Sustainability Development Goal, Anna replied “I decided on Goal 4 but still also feel really strong about Goal 5 especially being a ‘single’ mom and having a daughter. But I always promised my kids 3 things: unconditional love, experiences and education, so I went with Goal 4.”

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Seneca Fashion Professor Phillip Sparks Sustainability Development Goal #SDG

PSPhilip Sparks has been working as a tailor and designer for almost two decades, incorporating an art practice focused on textiles, photography and installations into the production and exhibition of his collections. During his career, he has worked in-house in the wardrobe and design departments at the National Ballet of Canada, The Canadian Opera Company, the Stratford Festival and Soulpepper Theatre. His clothing and accessory business has been carried at retailers including Holt Renfrew, Hudson’s Bay and La Maison Simons. Currently, Philip continues to further his research into the anthropology and anthropometry of tailoring while producing custom garments and serving as a professor in the School of Fashion

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“Of course quality education is the most important SDG for me, but also responsible consumption and production”