Teamwork in Greta Constantine’s Production Process #IndustryConnections

In part II of #IndustryConnections, we get up close and personal with the four Seneca Fashion Alumni from Greta Constantine, and unravel their history in this ever-evolving industry.

For four alumni of the Fashion Arts program at Seneca College, their dreams have come to reality. Kelsey Gulley, Shiva Hashemi, Doreen To, and Carla Nina never imagined they would be involved in one of Canada’s most influential fashion companies. They all work collectively at Greta Constantine (GC), a Toronto-based womenswear brand, and the 2018 Canadian Arts and Fashion Awards nominee. Shiva leads the Production Team; Doreen leads Private Client Experiences; Carla works in the Quality Control team, and Kelsey is GC’s Cutting Room Lead.

While GC has no storefront, their clothing can be found in over 40-doors worldwide across 15 countries, and their collections have been debut on VOGUE Runway and Paris Fashion Week. “The company has grown over the years, and we’re now a team of 16 people,” said Stephen Wong, Co-Founder, and Designer at GC. “We have various departments – design, patterns, cutting, production, quality control – and within each department, we have a lead who oversees the functions of their department. It is an open studio where people can see and hear everything as it occurs.”

When it comes to completing a final garment, the collective contributions of each team member and the cohesion of both the studio and its departments play an integral role. While their roles are different, Doreen, Kelsey, Carla, and Shiva collaborate each day to ensure that deadlines are met and that the final product is exceptional and ready for market.

Regardless of their roles or departments, the final product is always a team effort. “Everybody contributes to what we do and the team,” said Shiva, Production Manager at GC. “The final product is a result of the team, not just the work of one person. This is one part of learning the industry – you need to understand you cannot do this alone. Everybody is important in playing their part, and if one of our team members is not present, even for a day, it will affect the work we do.”

“We see each other every day,” said Doreen, Lead in Private Client Experiences at GC. “An everyday overview start goes something like this: The designer has the design, I make the patterns, and I pass it to Shiva, who oversees the sewing and passes the garment to Kelsey (Cutter). I then take the patterns and put them on the fabric and pass it to the sewer, who then passes it to quality control, who later gives the garment to Carla (Quality Associate) to ensure the garment is ready for the customer/store. Finally, it goes back to the designer and myself, and we put the outfit on Judy the Mannequin to make sure it’s good or if it needs altering. I then take notes, alter the garment, and we start the process again.”

From Zara to Greta Constantine: Meet Doreen To, Team Lead in Private Client Experience, Greta Constantine. Doreen graduated from the FA program in 2014.

Doreen To’s liking to fashion started with her love for shopping. Recalling her teenage years, she would often spend her weekends browsing through the aisles of Zara and H&M with her friends, stores she referred to as “Fast Fashion” – fashionable and affordable clothing aimed for millennials. Not long before completing high school, Doreen decided to pursue a career in fashion and applied to the Fashion Arts program at Seneca in 2010.

“My mindset was very immature in high school,” laughed Doreen, recalling that she underestimated just how complex the industry is. “I didn’t really know what fashion entailed. I thought if I like shopping and I’m artistic, then that’s all it takes. When I started the fashion program at Seneca, I was not prepared at all. My first class was pattern-drafting, and I didn’t come prepared with any of the tools or textbooks. I failed two of my classes in my first year, and I had to take a step back and ask myself, is this really what I want to do?”

Today, Doreen is grateful for completing the program, speaking fondly of the many worthwhile “late nights and long hours” she endured throughout her studies. In her role as Private Client Experience at Greta Constantine, she is responsible for all private client fittings, creating the sample pattern-drafting and fabric meetings for Greta’s three collections throughout the year. She also travels to Paris and New York with Greta’s executive team when taking their collections to market.

The transition to her newfound approach of the FA’s program, coupled with her appreciation for the complexities and nuisances that go behind designing, still assists Doreen with many of her day-to-day tasks and challenges at Greta. Some of her fondest memories at Seneca include the capstone project, showcasing at Seneca’s Redefining Design, the comradery she shared with her classmates, learning the core fashion skills of pattern-drafting and sewing, and the support of her professors.

Doreen still keeps in touch with a handful of her professors. “I look up to my professors! A lot of them work in the industry and have been very supportive throughout my studies and beyond,” said Doreen, explaining that most of the faculty are professionals that have worked in the industry for several years. “Having supportive people around you who understand your field is important.”

Before working at GC, Doreen worked in costume design for several film and production companies, including Stark Trek’s Television Series.

Next, meet Kelsey Gulley, an artist and an avid love for fashion – these are two defining characteristics of Kelsey Gulley that inspired her future in fashion design.

Unlike most high school students that face a hurdle of uncertainty when graduating, Kelsey always knew fashion would be a career path she would take. “I was ready to start as soon as possible and got into the Fashion Arts (FA) program at Seneca following high school,” explained Kelsey. “As a student, the program allowed me to dive fully into my art like never before. It’s fast-paced, a lot of hard work, but fully immersive and very fulfilling. It enabled me to focus solely on my passion and vision and dive into any creative path I wanted to take.”

Today, Kelsey is Cutting Room Lead at GC. “It was an opportunity I took following my internship – that itself was a valuable experience and allowed me to see first-hand how the knowledge I gained at Seneca is put into action in the industry,” said Kelsey.

On a day-to-day basis at Greta, Kelsey is responsible for ensuring all garments are cut and sewn on time and oversees the workflow and efficiency of the cutting team. Choosing the FA’s program for its “hands-on” component, Kelsey explains that the program made her confident in her abilities and understanding of garment creation from start to finish. “While design was my main focus, I am now a more well-rounded designer because I understand all aspects of the creation process,” said Kelsey. “The FA’s program offers a variety of different courses and allows you to explore so many aspects of fashion design to find what interests you. From fashion manipulation, textile dyeing and design, product development, and more, you get to dive into many creative vessels.”

When asked her most memorable experience as a student in the FA’s program, Kelsey explains it was her final capstone collection. “This project allowed me to deep-dive into my creative vision, unlike ever before. It included presenting my collection to a board of industry experts and receiving their feedback and advice. It left me with a clear understanding of how industry members think and allowed me to grow as a designer,” described Kelsey. “As well as, of course, the final year fashion show – the ultimate culmination of my hard work being displayed. It was the most fulfilling and joyful experience after my journey at Seneca.”

As Kelsey continues to grow her professional career at GC, she recounts her journey into fashion design and her inspiration that drives her every day. “I have been given so many opportunities to learn and grow not just as an employee, but as a person and as a designer. I am inspired as an artist to create work that exudes and provokes emotion. I am often inspired by feminism and female empowerment and wish to emanate that in my work. My work is thought-provoking, poetic, and a reflection of my own experiences and feelings.”

Our third alumni feature is Shiva Hashemi, FZ Alumni, 2018. Shiva is Team Lead of Production at GC.

Having a background in textiles and patchwork from her home country, Iran, Shiva Hashemi wanted to learn more about working with fabric when she moved to Canada. Admitted to Seneca’s Fashion Arts program in 2015, she decided that Seneca was the right fit for her.

“I chose Seneca for their curriculum,” recounted Shiva, explaining that she had offers to multiple colleges across Ontario. “Their program offers a more artistic approach to fashion, and I liked that they had various design courses. From the first to last semester, you’re given the tools that help bring your imagination to reality.”

Of the many valuable aspects of her studies, Shiva’s favorite courses were in Circular Economy and Sustainability. She also mentions her professors, many of which she still keeps in contact with, who helped her land her first internship with GC in 2018.

Within less than a year of completing her internship, Shiva now works as Production lead at the high-end Toronto women’s fashion brand, where she is responsible for quality control throughout the production process and developing the brand’s overall production calendar.

“I’m very proud of working at GC because each day, I’m surrounded and inspired by hard-working professionals who have been in the industry for many years. I’m so proud to get to say I’m a part of that.”

Last but certainly not least, we have FA graduate from 2018, Carla Nina, Quality Assurance Associate at GC.

Within the first few minutes of speaking with Carla Nina, Quality Assurance Associate at GC, you’ll quickly realize despite her young age, her determination and tenacity define much of her success.

An Indonesian native, Carla moved to Canada after high school in pursuit of a career in fashion. As a young girl, she had envisioned creating and designing works of art, recalling sowing as one of her favorite classes in high school. Having no industry experience, Carla applied to Seneca’s Fashion Arts program in 2015. She chose the program for its “more practical approach” as opposed to a theory-centric curriculum.

Many aspects of the program positively impacted Carla, ranging from the Learning Center that assigned her a student-mentor, to her professors that guided her throughout the application process for her internship with GC, and finally, to the technical elements of her program, including the sowing and pattern-making labs that played an integral role in preparing her for her career at GC.

Seneca’s Fashion Resource Center – a diverse collection of clothing, accessories, and shoes from various eras in history starting from the early 19th century – was a source of inspiration throughout Carla’s studies, especially during her final year, where she developed her collection for Seneca’s Redefining Design.

“My final year was my most memorable experience at Seneca, “explains Carla. “It’s gratifying because you’re pushed to the limit and have to take ownership of your work from beginning to end.”

We are #SenecaProud of our #SenecaFashion team at GC who are making their dreams a reality! “Teamwork makes the Dreamwork”

Alumni Spotlight: Alice Zhu, Fashion and Rebellion

Living with one foot in fashion and the other in dark dramatism, Alice Zhu’s work expresses her inner world and personality. “For me, fashion is a part of who I am, it’s about costumes, theatre, and art – like a performance in style.” Recipient of the Seneca School of Fashion Excellence Award, Alice has design confidence that isn’t afraid to break out of the mold.

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Her line, as seen at the 21stCentury Atelier: Redefining Fashion in a New Age of Design, held in partnership between Seneca College’s School of Fashion and the Royal Ontario Museum, features what she calls “Psycho Clown.” The line is designed in rebellion to mainstream retail garments and celebrates hip-hop streetwear and decorative vintage looks.

Using woven polyester, silk and cotton, Alice cuts silhouettes that are A-line and asymmetrical. She details and decorates using colour blocking, pleats and ruffles. “My clothes are meant to make a person stand out,” says Alice. “They’re made for Alexander McQueen style runway shows, for theatre and movies, they’re meant to attract attention and create a mood.”

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Observing the streetwear designs in her line, one sees oversized jackets and petite tweed tops (reminiscent of Chanel’s suit material) that have creepy smiley faces on them. “These clothes mock conformist fashion – I believe following trends is wasteful” she says. Then she points to her masks and continues, “I have a zero-waste ideology. I make these masks out of wasted fabric, and give these shreds meaning.”

Owing a lot to the faculty at Seneca, especially the support of the Academic Chair for the School of Fashion, Gitte Hansen, and practicing fashion designer and instructor Zoran Dobric, Alice says her confidence and exposure, as well as her technical skills are all attributed to her years in Seneca and her relationships with the department even as an alumnus.

Today, Alice’s own style is simple; she wears flare cut black pants and a plain, beautiful black top with full sleeves that she says she stitched herself. She wears delicate cornrows on her head to hold her hair back from her face. “I used to be interested in rebellious, dramatic, gothic and punk looks and hairstyles, but as I grew older I began to spend less time on how I dress and more time on my work – today my rebellion is in my designs.”

Alumni Spotlight: Kinoo Arcentales

This week we explore the talented work of Kinoo Arcentales, #SenecaFashion Graduate

“An Echo in History”

To his surprise, Kinoo Arcentales’ journey into the fashion industry was swift and unexpected. Reflecting on the moment when he decided to pursue fashion, Kinoo said, “I never expected being a designer. It was actually during my studies at Seneca, during the RED: Emerging Designer Showcase, where I first took fashion seriously.”

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Born in Toronto and raised in Quito, Ecuador, Kinoo is a third-generation fashion designer of Kichwa and Mestizo heritage. Following the footsteps of his grandmother, he explains that like her, he built his success from nothing. Today at the age of 25, Kinoo’s talent and wisdom shines beyond his years. He has designed his own collection, AN.D.N,which earned him the 2016 Rowenta Award for ‘Best In Show’ at Redefining Design and is the owner of Pacha Indigenous Art Collection, located in downtown Toronto; recognized for selling hand-made bags, textiles, art and jewelry created in collaboration with Indigenous communities in Canada.

Showcasing his collection AN.D.Nat the the 21st Century Atelier: Redefining Fashion in a New Age of Design, a collaborative event by the Seneca School of Fashion and the Royal Ontario Museum, Kinoo describes the opportunity “as a privilege”. Working with an androgynous theme, Kinoo created AN.D.N for both men and women and designed silhouettes that closely resemble clothing found in Otavalo, Ecuador – his hometown. Showcased at the event was Kinoo’s favourite design – a Navajo poncho wrapped around a black jacket, worn with draped pants and a dark hazel skirt.

 

Kinoo considers fashion as an expression of activism, and strives to transform and transcend the stereotypical perception and image of Indigenous art. His mission is to inspire and encourage the younger generation to embrace their traditions and identity, while at the same time, remain detached from conservative ideals.  “AN.D.Ncan be understood as an approach to a prophecy,” says Kinoo. The logo for his company – Yana Manta, which translates to “I am from the void” – envisions an eagle and condor flying in harmony, signifying the fulfilment of a prophecy that traces back 500 years. “The condor and the eagle represent two separate forces from the south and the north, meeting to revolutionize and create a new culture or rebirth. It’s a sign that all Indigenous communities from around the world will gather together.

 

Speaking on his experience after graduating from the Seneca School of Fashion, Kinoo says, “It turns out the fashion industry is really hard. It’s rewarding and of course you have your five minutes of fame — but what’s more important is not being an echo, but a roar through history. The aftermath is what I’m more concerned with for myself, and what is going to happen five years from now.” In the future, Kinoo wants to continue working with the community and hopes to create a new collection. “I think it’s time to put AN.D.N. to rest. I’m very proud of it, but I think it’s time for it to be put aside and let the next thing take over.”

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When asked what advice he would give to students at the Seneca School of Fashion, Kinoo said, “The fashion industry is bitter-sweet. It’s hard. Work really hard. You have to have a very strong attitude and ethic of work. You can’t go there thinking it’s easy and that I’m going to get a job. If that doesn’t happen, create your own job, create your own position. Build it from something and invest in yourself.”

 

 

Alumni​ Spotlight: Sepideh Ghahremani

Inspired by the vibrant colours and intricate patterns of Iranian architecture, Sepideh Ghahremani’s collections, Deevaand Forest Glory, reflects the symmetrical and lustrous imagery of the traditional Persian Baagh (garden), that can be found in her country of origin, Iran.

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With a background in fashion design from the University of Tehran, and a painter by profession, Sepideh has always had the desire to work in the fashion industry. Owing her artistic process to her background in painting, Sepideh approaches fashion design through an idiosyncratic and creative lens, seeing the human body as a surface for her artistic expression.

Her collections Deevaand Forest Glory, showcased at the 21stCentury Atelier: Redefining Fashion in a New Age of Design, a collaborative event between the Seneca School of Fashion and the Royal Ontario Museum, is one of the highlights of her career. “[This is] a very unexpected opportunity for me,” says Sepideh. “I’m thankful to Seneca for involving me in this event, and to display my designs right next to Dior…It’s just fantastic. My collection is very feminine — and I try to be more focused on the feminine body type – in many ways, it’s related [to Dior].” commented Sepideh. The event ran concurrent with the Christian Dior exhibit, a brand she considers as one of her biggest influences.

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Using silk, hand-dyed satin and fabrics that she designs herself, Sepideh visually captures and manipulates organic elements found in nature, adorning her fabrics with shapes of flowers or leaves, in the attempt to create an illusion of being one with nature.

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One of her most praised pieces in the event features a design from her Forest Glorycollection; a mid-length, deep mauve and black A-line dress, embellished with symmetrical leaves across the front and back. The inspiration of the design – a leaf she photographed and later sketched into fabric.

Sepideh’s choice to highlight vivid colours in her silhouettes are intentional, which she traces back to fashion trends she observed while living in Iran. Patterns and embroidery in ruby red, deep purple, dusty pink, rich blues, golds and black are some of the colours seen on clothing worn by women in Iran, and similarly on Sepideh’s designs.

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When asked what she would like to tell fashion Students at Seneca, Sepideh said, “If you have a passion for fashion, pursue it!  It is not an easy industry. There will be a lot of designers who will be in the same position as you and you need to work hard.”

 

 

 

 

 

Alumni Spotlight: Michelle Nicol, CERP

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Did you know that Seneca Fashion offers a certificate in Event Management; Event and Exhibit Design? Meet Michelle Nicol, a graduate from the first year the program was offered! We are so proud of what she has been able to accomplish over the past two years and look forward to watching her continued success – enjoy!

Full name: Michelle Nicol, CERP

Program:  Event Management; Event & Exhibit Design

Grad Year: 2006

Current Position: Account Manager, Festival Specialist (Higgins Event Rentals)

What is your favorite Seneca memory?

My favorite Seneca memory has to be working on the Design Exchange Gala with my classmates and professors. It was such a gorgeous venue and great opportunity to work on an event from inception to completion. Another memory, which is perhaps more of a lesson that I still look back at and laugh at to this day. During a group project where we had to design a tabletop, one of my classmates was adamant on using a feather boa as a centerpiece and one of the judges said it looked like roadkill. Needless to say, we didn’t do so well on that project. Lesson learned: follow your design instinct and never put feathers in a centerpiece! If something does not go your way, get back up and try again. We learn from our mistakes.

If you could give one piece of advice to a student completing the same program as you, what would it be?

Don’t be afraid to get out there, introduce yourself and make a name for yourself! The competition is stiff in the Event Industry; you have to stand out, be relatable and friendly. People will remember how you made them feel, not necessarily what you did for them.

How has your career evolved?

I have grown tremendously in my profession and have really made “rental” a lifelong career, which I love! Sitting on multiple committees for local, national and international industry-related associations keeps me busy and involved in the ever-evolving event industry. I have recently been recognized with an award for Rental Person of the Year and have been named a “Top 10 Under 40” for the American Rental Association! I continue to write articles for industry associated publications and am one of few CERP (Certified Event Rental Professionals) in Canada. 

How did your Seneca program help you get to where you are now/your current career?

I was referred to a large local rental company by one of their greatest customers, who was also a professor of mine at Seneca College. Upon graduation, I accepted a position with them and my career has grown since then.

Do you have any other thoughts or memories you would like to share?

Be a fruit loop in a world of Cheerios!